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  1. #11
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    Cdnfireman's Avatar
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    Re: Low vs High gear on the trails

    Quote Originally Posted by j335 View Post
    Good rule of thumb is under 30 run low. You can tell when it’s too fast for low then stop and shift to high. I’ve seen a few people blow belts going too slow/hard for high gear
    Well said. This is what I do. Only takes a few seconds to stop and shift the ranges. Saves on belt and clutch problems.



  2. #12
    Member Megrizzly's Avatar
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    Re: Low vs High gear on the trails

    An additional thing to keep in mind if your atv/sxs has a wet clutch. In high range, the wet clutch doesn't lock in until a certain speed (ex. I believe it was around 10km/h on a grizzly).

  3. #13
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    Re: Low vs High gear on the trails

    Honestly, I wouldn't worry too much about it. Just use common sense. If you're doing lots of starting and stopping at very low speeds, on hills, or in deep/sticky stuff then definitely use your low gear, otherwise high gear will be fine for damned near everything. If your RPM is climbing and your tires aren't moving, something (belt/clutch) is wearing. In my opinion, you are just unnecessarily burning through fuel and running at an unnecessarily high RPM if you run in low all the time. I only ever suggest leaving it low as much as possible to those who just can't grasp the concept of gearing or when low might be necessary. If I recall, you bought yourself a newer model Sportsman which has pretty good clutching that doesn't need to be babied they way some other brands do.
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  4. #14
    Member bigmikeystylez's Avatar
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    Re: Low vs High gear on the trails

    well....we have been to bruderheim and redwater....simple trails with a little bit of snow on them but not much.....so not a lot of wheel spin. We have kept is in low.....no idea how fast we were going but it definitely didnt feel like we were high revving a lot (at the point where it felt like we should be using high gear - based on rpm). We dont go real slow on the trails but not really super fast either.

    Can you damage the belt/trans if going to slow in high gear on the trails? (assuming the conditions right now - frozen ground with minimal snow)

  5. #15
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    Re: Low vs High gear on the trails

    Quote Originally Posted by bigmikeystylez View Post
    well....we have been to bruderheim and redwater....simple trails with a little bit of snow on them but not much.....so not a lot of wheel spin. We have kept is in low.....no idea how fast we were going but it definitely didnt feel like we were high revving a lot (at the point where it felt like we should be using high gear - based on rpm). We dont go real slow on the trails but not really super fast either.

    Can you damage the belt/trans if going to slow in high gear on the trails? (assuming the conditions right now - frozen ground with minimal snow)
    On frozen ground with minimal snow you could probably use high range all day with no problems. Where you run into problems with a belt driven machine is when you’re going slow at low RPM and then something puts a big load on your tires (deep mud, crawling over a downed tree etc), and you lean on the throttle. At low rpm and low speed in high range the clutch has a minimum of grab on the belt. When you goose the throttle with a big load on the tires the belt slips until the rpm comes up enough to grab the belt tight enough to overcome the load and turn the tires. This slippage is what destroys the belt.
    Running in low range keeps the rpm up and keeps the clutch tight on the belt. When the sudden increased load happens, the clutch is tight enough on the belt to prevent slippage.
    As you get used to your machine you’ll be able to recognize when you’re at the edge of slipping the belt and know it’s time to use low range. For tigh muddy trails I’d use low range. When you get to an open area go back to high and move faster.

  6. #16
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    Re: Low vs High gear on the trails

    Also, it's worth mentioning that you will probably smell the belt burning if it is slipping excessively. The smell doesn't necessarily mean that you just fried your belt, but it is a good indicator that it is either ready to be replaced or you are putting too much stress on it.

    It's a really good idea to learn how to change your belt and carry a spare with you, particularly if you start going on longer trips where it's not as easy to get back to the vehicles like it is in Redwater or Bruderheim. I have never had a belt go on the trail but I do faithfully carry a spare on every machine along with the tools to change it.
    - 2015 Outlander XT-P 1000, 28" Zillas, Rad Relocate, Snorkel, QSC Primary, STM Secondary
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    - Red Armour 2009 Grizzly 700SE, 26" XTR's, Airdam Clutch, Warn Wireless
    - 2013 GMC 3500 Denali Diesel

  7. #17
    Member Ronaha's Avatar
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    Re: Low vs High gear on the trails

    I found the high low thing fusterating coming off a foot shift Honda, H/L shifting is kinda a pain in mixed terrain if your really braaaapn.

  8. #18
    Member brutematt750's Avatar
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    Re: Low vs High gear on the trails

    Run it in low. and if it sounds like your over revving put it in high. Low range isn't gonna hurt anything.
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  9. #19
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    Re: Low vs High gear on the trails

    Quote Originally Posted by brutematt750 View Post
    Run it in low. and if it sounds like your over revving put it in high. Low range isn't gonna hurt anything.
    Seems pretty straight forward doesnít it ? Low vs High gear on the trailsLow vs High gear on the trails

  10. #20
    Member hbar218's Avatar
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    Re: Low vs High gear on the trails

    Quote Originally Posted by brutematt750 View Post
    Run it in low. and if it sounds like your over revving put it in high. Low range isn't gonna hurt anything.
    one could say " run it in high , if it feels sluggish or boggy, or you smell burning belt, lol, put it in low"

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